Welcome to AutoForumz.com!
FAQFAQ    SearchSearch      ProfileProfile    Private MessagesPrivate Messages   Log inLog in

HHO generator on a diesel?

 
   car problems (Home) -> Mercedes-Benz RSS
Next:  88 Camry Transmission noise  
Author Message
DougS

External


Since: Nov 27, 2007
Posts: 32



(Msg. 1) Posted: Sun Jul 27, 2008 5:59 pm
Post subject: HHO generator on a diesel?
Archived from groups: alt>auto>mercedes (more info?)

Does anyone know whether its ok to run one of those HHO generators on
a diesel engine? My father-in-law is building one for his turbo Saab
car, and swears that they are used in big rigs (diesels) and that they
improve the fuel mileage on them.
In case anyone doesn't know what an HHO generator is, it's basically
an electric circuit that ionizes water into hydrogen and oxygen, then
injects the gas into the air stream of the intake.

My thought is that the diesel runs off of fuel being injected into the
air (and only air) in the chamber. If I add more oxygen and hydrogen
into the air, it will burn more readily, but it seems that it would
throw off the timing of the ignition.

Anyone have any input, or comments? Does anyone use one of these on a
diesel (or gasoline) engine currently?

 >> Stay informed about: HHO generator on a diesel? 
Back to top
Login to vote
RF

External


Since: Apr 30, 2008
Posts: 52



(Msg. 2) Posted: Sun Jul 27, 2008 6:40 pm
Post subject: Re: HHO generator on a diesel? [Login to view extended thread Info.]
Archived from groups: per prev. post (more info?)

DougS wrote:
> Does anyone know whether its ok to run one of those HHO generators on
> a diesel engine? My father-in-law is building one for his turbo Saab
> car, and swears that they are used in big rigs (diesels) and that they
> improve the fuel mileage on them.
> In case anyone doesn't know what an HHO generator is, it's basically
> an electric circuit that ionizes water into hydrogen and oxygen, then
> injects the gas into the air stream of the intake.
>
> My thought is that the diesel runs off of fuel being injected into the
> air (and only air) in the chamber. If I add more oxygen and hydrogen
> into the air, it will burn more readily, but it seems that it would
> throw off the timing of the ignition.
>
> Anyone have any input, or comments? Does anyone use one of these on a
> diesel (or gasoline) engine currently?

In my opinion, the energy required to split the
H2O molecules would be more
than you are likely to get back but, if using
solar or other free source of energy, it indeed
could be feasible.

It reminds me of a guy way back who told me that
he had a 5 HP electric motor attached to the grid
and was planning to attach a fan to it to blow air
onto a wind turbine. It seems that he expected to
get more energy out than he was putting in. I
disabused him in a hurry.

 >> Stay informed about: HHO generator on a diesel? 
Back to top
Login to vote
"-->> T.G. Lambach

External


Since: Jan 21, 2007
Posts: 175



(Msg. 3) Posted: Sun Jul 27, 2008 9:08 pm
Post subject: Re: HHO generator on a diesel? [Login to view extended thread Info.]
Archived from groups: per prev. post (more info?)

"but it seems that it would throw off the timing of the ignition."

No, a diesel's ignition occurs when the fuel is injected into the
cylinder; that occurs regardless of what gases are in the cylinder.

However, a gasoline engine will differ because the fuel is injected into
the intake air before any compression from the piston occurs so that air
- fuel mixture may preignite - always a problem with gas engines.
--

© 2008 T.G.Lambach. Publication in any form requires prior written
permission.
 >> Stay informed about: HHO generator on a diesel? 
Back to top
Login to vote
Tiger1

External


Since: Jan 07, 2004
Posts: 1281



(Msg. 4) Posted: Sun Jul 27, 2008 11:46 pm
Post subject: Re: HHO generator on a diesel? [Login to view extended thread Info.]
Archived from groups: per prev. post (more info?)

What is yor father in law's experience with HHO? What kind of fuel mileage
increase has he recorded? I am interested in this too for diesel.

I do know someone who is a mechanic who has friend who does that for
business and claimed to work real well... but he himself did not tinker into
it as his buddies are working out all the kinks.
 >> Stay informed about: HHO generator on a diesel? 
Back to top
Login to vote
runbiodiesel

External


Since: Nov 14, 2007
Posts: 30



(Msg. 5) Posted: Mon Jul 28, 2008 4:56 am
Post subject: Re: HHO generator on a diesel? [Login to view extended thread Info.]
Archived from groups: per prev. post (more info?)

On Jul 27, 5:08 pm, "-->> T.G. Lambach <<--" <"T.G. Lambach at
NoHamorSpamcomcast.net"> wrote:
> "but it seems that it would throw off the timing of the ignition."
>
> No, a diesel's ignition occurs when the fuel is injected into the
> cylinder; that occurs regardless of what gases are in the cylinder.
>
> However, a gasoline engine will differ because the fuel is injected into
> the intake air before any compression from the piston occurs so that air
> - fuel mixture may preignite - always a problem with gas engines.
> --
>
> © 2008 T.G.Lambach. Publication in any form requires prior written
> permission.

I hate to say it because I'd love to believe it would work but RF is
right. If more power was being returned to the engine than was needed
to generate the electricity to split the water molecules, you have
achieved the impossible -- the makings of a perpetual motion machine.
These contraptions will always use more energy than they create if you
are simply drawing power from the alternator. An exception, as RF
noted, would be if you were to get the extra power from a solar cell,
or if you had a system that generated electricty only as a means of
slowing the car down (like hybrids when they coast). But, in this
latter system, the power draw would have to cease once you were using
the engine to accelerate again so you would only generate surplus
power when braking which likely wouldn't last long.

All this also begs the question of whether it wouldn't be more
efficient to use the power from using the solar cells or braking
dynamo to power an electric motor to drive the car. I'm guessing it
would be since that's what they chose to do with hybrids but I don't
know.

On the other question, Tom, couldn't the Hydrogen predetonate on the
compression stroke since it would enter the cylinder with the air on
the intake stroke unlike the fuel?
 >> Stay informed about: HHO generator on a diesel? 
Back to top
Login to vote
Tiger1

External


Since: Jan 07, 2004
Posts: 1281



(Msg. 6) Posted: Mon Jul 28, 2008 1:38 pm
Post subject: Re: HHO generator on a diesel? [Login to view extended thread Info.]
Archived from groups: per prev. post (more info?)

We are not trying to generate a ton of Hydrogen... only a tiny amount that
does improve the efficiency of burning the fuel.

The real test of H production is hooking up a balloon to the HHO generator
and if the balloon rises... H is produced.
 >> Stay informed about: HHO generator on a diesel? 
Back to top
Login to vote
RF

External


Since: Apr 30, 2008
Posts: 52



(Msg. 7) Posted: Mon Jul 28, 2008 5:03 pm
Post subject: Re: HHO generator on a diesel? [Login to view extended thread Info.]
Archived from groups: per prev. post (more info?)

Tiger wrote:
> We are not trying to generate a ton of Hydrogen... only a tiny amount that
> does improve the efficiency of burning the fuel.
>
> The real test of H production is hooking up a balloon to the HHO generator
> and if the balloon rises... H is produced.

If this tiny amount of H2 could react with another
chemical in the combustion chamber to produce an
additional exothermic chemical reaction, then it
is possible that this process could make a
contribution to the usual combustion.
 >> Stay informed about: HHO generator on a diesel? 
Back to top
Login to vote
DougS

External


Since: Nov 27, 2007
Posts: 32



(Msg. 8) Posted: Mon Jul 28, 2008 7:46 pm
Post subject: Re: HHO generator on a diesel? [Login to view extended thread Info.]
Archived from groups: per prev. post (more info?)

On Jul 28, 4:03 pm, RF wrote:
> Tiger wrote:
> > We are not trying to generate a ton of Hydrogen... only a tiny amount that
> > does improve the efficiency of burning the fuel.
>
> > The real test of H production is hooking up a balloon to the HHO generator
> > and if the balloon rises... H is produced.
>
> If this tiny amount of H2 could react with another
> chemical in the combustion chamber to produce an
> additional exothermic chemical reaction, then it
> is possible that this process could make a
> contribution to the usual combustion.

Just to clarify for those that are making assumptions about the energy
requirements, and ability for it to work at all. I does work. At
least, my father-in-law has got his working. Currently, he has it
attached to a '93 Saab 900 turbo (2.0L). It gets about 24-28 mpg
normally, and he has pushed it up to 28+ with his initial tests. I
haven't talked to him in a couple of days, but I heard a few minutes
ago that he's added a second container to the system to help produce
more gas.
From what he's told me, and what he's observed, the system doesn't
produce an enormous amount of hydrogen gas. The first container he
used actually sucked in from the engine vacuum overpowering the
sidewalls of the container (cheap plastic). So, there is no
pressurized production of hydrogen here, just enough to enrich the air/
fuel mixture.

Yes, it does take more energy to convert water into hydrogen gas, but
we're not running the car on hydrogen (or even electricity), we are
running on gasoline (or diesel as the case may be), and we simply want
to make this combustion process more efficient. The hydrogen allows
the air/fuel mixture to be more lean and still obtain the same power
from the fuel as before. If you don't understand that, the more lean
the mixture (air/fuel) the less fuel (i.e. gasoline) you use.

Gasoline engines aren't the most efficient machines at burning all the
fuel that enters them. When you pressurize the air (add a turbo) you
get a better efficiency that normally aspirated engines. When you add
hydrogen to the mixture, it gets even more efficient. Thus, less
gasoline used per mile driven. (more mpg)

Interestingly, this link says that the engine is more efficient while
idling than under full load when using this concept, which is where
you really need to cut fuel usage.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hydrogen_fuel_enhancement
 >> Stay informed about: HHO generator on a diesel? 
Back to top
Login to vote
trader41

External


Since: Dec 28, 2004
Posts: 142



(Msg. 9) Posted: Tue Jul 29, 2008 9:24 am
Post subject: Re: HHO generator on a diesel? [Login to view extended thread Info.]
Archived from groups: per prev. post (more info?)

On Jul 28, 6:46 pm, DougS wrote:
> On Jul 28, 4:03 pm, RF wrote:
>
> > Tiger wrote:
> > > We are not trying to generate a ton of Hydrogen... only a tiny amount that
> > > does improve the efficiency of burning the fuel.
>
> > > The real test of H production is hooking up a balloon to the HHO generator
> > > and if the balloon rises... H is produced.
>
> > If this tiny amount of H2 could react with another
> > chemical in the combustion chamber to produce an
> > additional exothermic chemical reaction, then it
> > is possible that this process could make a
> > contribution to the usual combustion.
>
> Just to clarify for those that are making assumptions about the energy
> requirements, and ability for it to work at all. I does work. At
> least, my father-in-law has got his working. Currently, he has it
> attached to a '93 Saab 900 turbo (2.0L). It gets about 24-28 mpg
> normally, and he has pushed it up to 28+ with his initial tests.

That doesn't sound particularly promising. What exactly is 28+? If
he was getting 24-28, and is now getting 28.X from limited data, this
doesn't mean much. For example, after investing time, energy and
belief in this system, it wouldn;t be unusual for someone to also
alter their driving habits, either consciously or not, which could
have a significant effect on the results.



I
> haven't talked to him in a couple of days, but I heard a few minutes
> ago that he's added a second container to the system to help produce
> more gas.
> From what he's told me, and what he's observed, the system doesn't
> produce an enormous amount of hydrogen gas. The first container he
> used actually sucked in from the engine vacuum overpowering the
> sidewalls of the container (cheap plastic). So, there is no
> pressurized production of hydrogen here, just enough to enrich the air/
> fuel mixture.
>
> Yes, it does take more energy to convert water into hydrogen gas, but
> we're not running the car on hydrogen (or even electricity), we are
> running on gasoline (or diesel as the case may be), and we simply want
> to make this combustion process more efficient. The hydrogen allows
> the air/fuel mixture to be more lean and still obtain the same power
> from the fuel as before. If you don't understand that, the more lean
> the mixture (air/fuel) the less fuel (i.e. gasoline) you use.
>
> Gasoline engines aren't the most efficient machines at burning all the
> fuel that enters them. When you pressurize the air (add a turbo) you
> get a better efficiency that normally aspirated engines. When you add
> hydrogen to the mixture, it gets even more efficient. Thus, less
> gasoline used per mile driven. (more mpg)
>
> Interestingly, this link says that the engine is more efficient while
> idling than under full load when using this concept, which is where
> you really need to cut fuel usage.
>
> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hydrogen_fuel_enhancement

If anyone has any independent testing by any credible authority that
shows this works, I'd love to see it. As I understand it, what we're
talking about here is doing this to a standard engine as a simple bolt
on widget without modifying anything else, like the engine computer,
which governs much of how it operates, including the fuel/air
mixture. The above wikepedia article doesn't sound too promising, as
after it talks about the technology, it says possible to reduce fuel
consumption by 4% and that was apparently through engines designed to
make use of it, not via a simple add on.
 >> Stay informed about: HHO generator on a diesel? 
Back to top
Login to vote
runbiodiesel

External


Since: Nov 14, 2007
Posts: 30



(Msg. 10) Posted: Tue Jul 29, 2008 7:25 pm
Post subject: Re: HHO generator on a diesel? [Login to view extended thread Info.]
Archived from groups: per prev. post (more info?)

On Jul 29, 5:24 am, "trad...@optonline.net"
wrote:
> On Jul 28, 6:46 pm, DougS wrote:
>
>
>
> > On Jul 28, 4:03 pm, RF wrote:
>
> > > Tiger wrote:
> > > > We are not trying to generate a ton of Hydrogen... only a tiny amount that
> > > > does improve the efficiency of burning the fuel.
>
> > > > The real test of H production is hooking up a balloon to the HHO generator
> > > > and if the balloon rises... H is produced.
>
> > > If this tiny amount of H2 could react with another
> > > chemical in the combustion chamber to produce an
> > > additional exothermic chemical reaction, then it
> > > is possible that this process could make a
> > > contribution to the usual combustion.
>
> > Just to clarify for those that are making assumptions about the energy
> > requirements, and ability for it to work at all. I does work. At
> > least, my father-in-law has got his working. Currently, he has it
> > attached to a '93 Saab 900 turbo (2.0L). It gets about 24-28 mpg
> > normally, and he has pushed it up to 28+ with his initial tests.
>
> That doesn't sound particularly promising. What exactly is 28+? If
> he was getting 24-28, and is now getting 28.X from limited data, this
> doesn't mean much. For example, after investing time, energy and
> belief in this system, it wouldn;t be unusual for someone to also
> alter their driving habits, either consciously or not, which could
> have a significant effect on the results.
>
> I
>
>
>
> > haven't talked to him in a couple of days, but I heard a few minutes
> > ago that he's added a second container to the system to help produce
> > more gas.
> > From what he's told me, and what he's observed, the system doesn't
> > produce an enormous amount of hydrogen gas. The first container he
> > used actually sucked in from the engine vacuum overpowering the
> > sidewalls of the container (cheap plastic). So, there is no
> > pressurized production of hydrogen here, just enough to enrich the air/
> > fuel mixture.
>
> > Yes, it does take more energy to convert water into hydrogen gas, but
> > we're not running the car on hydrogen (or even electricity), we are
> > running on gasoline (or diesel as the case may be), and we simply want
> > to make this combustion process more efficient. The hydrogen allows
> > the air/fuel mixture to be more lean and still obtain the same power
> > from the fuel as before. If you don't understand that, the more lean
> > the mixture (air/fuel) the less fuel (i.e. gasoline) you use.
>
> > Gasoline engines aren't the most efficient machines at burning all the
> > fuel that enters them. When you pressurize the air (add a turbo) you
> > get a better efficiency that normally aspirated engines. When you add
> > hydrogen to the mixture, it gets even more efficient. Thus, less
> > gasoline used per mile driven. (more mpg)
>
> > Interestingly, this link says that the engine is more efficient while
> > idling than under full load when using this concept, which is where
> > you really need to cut fuel usage.
>
> >http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hydrogen_fuel_enhancement
>
> If anyone has any independent testing by any credible authority that
> shows this works, I'd love to see it. As I understand it, what we're
> talking about here is doing this to a standard engine as a simple bolt
> on widget without modifying anything else, like the engine computer,
> which governs much of how it operates, including the fuel/air
> mixture. The above wikepedia article doesn't sound too promising, as
> after it talks about the technology, it says possible to reduce fuel
> consumption by 4% and that was apparently through engines designed to
> make use of it, not via a simple add on.


There is a recent article that covers this concept as well as the
"water powered car" claims in Popular Mechanics:
http://www.popularmechanics.com/automotive/new_cars/4271579.html.

Tiger, no question that electrolysis produces hydrogen and oxygen.
What's questionable is whether there is any net energy returned in the
process which requires energy itself. Judging by the article above and
some other sources the best answer from actual testing seems to be
possibly a very modest improvement . . . in a specially tuned engine.

Interesting discussion though. Always good to learn about new things.
 >> Stay informed about: HHO generator on a diesel? 
Back to top
Login to vote
Kadaitcha Man

External


Since: Jul 20, 2008
Posts: 5



(Msg. 11) Posted: Tue Aug 05, 2008 2:25 pm
Post subject: Re: HHO generator on a diesel? [Login to view extended thread Info.]
Archived from groups: per prev. post (more info?)

"DougS" wrote in message
> Does anyone know whether its ok to run one of those HHO generators on
> a diesel engine? My father-in-law is building one for his turbo Saab
> car, and swears that they are used in big rigs (diesels) and that they
> improve the fuel mileage on them.
> In case anyone doesn't know what an HHO generator is, it's basically
> an electric circuit that ionizes water into hydrogen and oxygen, then
> injects the gas into the air stream of the intake.
>
> My thought is that the diesel runs off of fuel being injected into the
> air (and only air) in the chamber. If I add more oxygen and hydrogen
> into the air, it will burn more readily, but it seems that it would
> throw off the timing of the ignition.
>
> Anyone have any input, or comments? Does anyone use one of these on a
> diesel (or gasoline) engine currently?



If you can't burn that HHO gas outside the engine, it won't burn inside the engine neither. Simple law. Don't believe in a scam, Don't be cheap.... and Don't look for trouble.
 >> Stay informed about: HHO generator on a diesel? 
Back to top
Login to vote
Kadaitcha Man

External


Since: Jul 20, 2008
Posts: 5



(Msg. 12) Posted: Tue Aug 05, 2008 2:38 pm
Post subject: Re: HHO generator on a diesel? [Login to view extended thread Info.]
Archived from groups: sci>energy>hydrogen, others (more info?)

wrote in message
On Aug 3, 5:29 pm, "Bob Eld" wrote:
> "Kadaitcha Man"
> wrote in
> messagenews:pdCdnSqHBtkDTQjVnZ2dnUVZ_rrinZ2d@posted.toastnet...
> Posted Jul 18th 2008 at 5:01PM by Domenick Yoney
>
> The Coast to Coast Am late night radio talk show, hosted nowadays by George
> Noory, often lends a sympathetic ear to those with a bizarre tale to tell or
> folks making outlandish claims. After being deluged with calls and emails to
> the show asking about assertions made of increasing gas mileage using kits
> such as those sold by Water4gas, (they claim to break water down into HHO
> and burn it along with your gasoline) George decided to try a "real life"
> experiment to see if it actually worked. With his producer's car.
>
> It took some time for the results to come in but last night, after an update
> on the latest in alien implants, producer Tom Danheiser came on the air to
> let the audience of millions hear the result. Before installing the device
> under the hood of his Mustang, Danheiser calculated his gas mileage to be
> 17.99 mpg. After driving around with the device for a week his mileage went
> down to 16.56 mpg. To add insult to HHO hoax injury, he had to have his car
> serviced. Twice. The bottom line can be summed up with a pair of truisms;
> there is no free lunch and the laws of physics just aren't made to be
> broken.
>
> [Source: Coast to Coast AM]
> Tags: Coast to Coast AM, CoastToCoastAm, George Noory, GeorgeNoory, HHO,
> scam, water-4-gas
>
> You mean the laws of thermodynamics are still intact? I'm shocked, simply
> shocked!

I take it that this is not the same coast-to-coast run that CNN is
following, or is it?

I believe that the CNN run involved running an older car on either
reclamed vegetable oil mixed with biodiesel (or something similiar).
That run, at least as reported on the CNN website is turning into a
disaster, with a humerous side to it. Last time I saw a report, that
car was stranded somewhere in the soutwest after man breakdowns, and
had to be towed at a cost of $600 to the closest town with a repair
shop, the crew having given up on repairing it themselves which got
them slowly through the first 900-miles or so.

What to me makes the story funny, is that the 'experts' directly in
this demo expected fuel filter problems, and had cautiously packed 4
spare fuel filters. Part of the problem that they encountered on the
road was that they had packed the wrong fuel filters, which didn't fit
the car. (Heck, doesn't everyone drive carrying 4 spare fuel filters?
L0L). At last reading, and addition problem was that the fuel they
were using had degraded the fuel lines themselves to the point of
serious leakage. (I suspect that they meant the short neoprene flex
links that connect the fuel lines, but the report was not that
specific.)

They should maybe have packed more duct tape! Smile

I'm going to check on the CNN website later today, to see if there are
any new reports. At last report, they were stranded somewhere outside
of Phoenix (?).

Harry C.
 >> Stay informed about: HHO generator on a diesel? 
Back to top
Login to vote
hhc314

External


Since: Aug 05, 2008
Posts: 5



(Msg. 13) Posted: Tue Aug 05, 2008 5:37 pm
Post subject: Re: HHO generator on a diesel? [Login to view extended thread Info.]
Archived from groups: per prev. post (more info?)

On Aug 5, 1:38 pm, "Kadaitcha Man"
wrote:
> wrote in messagenews:d4b6bb1d-be63-4e64-8d8a-2ea02403e7d9@59g2000hsb.googlegroups.com...
>
> On Aug 3, 5:29 pm, "Bob Eld" wrote:
>
>
>
>
>
> > "Kadaitcha Man"
> > wrote in
> > messagenews:pdCdnSqHBtkDTQjVnZ2dnUVZ_rrinZ2d@posted.toastnet...
> > Posted Jul 18th 2008 at 5:01PM by Domenick Yoney
>
> > The Coast to Coast Am late night radio talk show, hosted nowadays by George
> > Noory, often lends a sympathetic ear to those with a bizarre tale to tell or
> > folks making outlandish claims. After being deluged with calls and emails to
> > the show asking about assertions made of increasing gas mileage using kits
> > such as those sold by Water4gas, (they claim to break water down into HHO
> > and burn it along with your gasoline) George decided to try a "real life"
> > experiment to see if it actually worked. With his producer's car.
>
> > It took some time for the results to come in but last night, after an update
> > on the latest in alien implants, producer Tom Danheiser came on the air to
> > let the audience of millions hear the result. Before installing the device
> > under the hood of his Mustang, Danheiser calculated his gas mileage to be
> > 17.99 mpg. After driving around with the device for a week his mileage went
> > down to 16.56 mpg. To add insult to HHO hoax injury, he had to have his car
> > serviced. Twice. The bottom line can be summed up with a pair of truisms;
> > there is no free lunch and the laws of physics just aren't made to be
> > broken.
>
> > [Source: Coast to Coast AM]
> > Tags: Coast to Coast AM, CoastToCoastAm, George Noory, GeorgeNoory, HHO,
> > scam, water-4-gas
>
> > You mean the laws of thermodynamics are still intact? I'm shocked, simply
> > shocked!
>
> I take it that this is not the same coast-to-coast run that CNN is
> following, or is it?
>
> I believe that the CNN run involved running an older car on either
> reclamed vegetable oil mixed with biodiesel (or something similiar).
> That run, at least as reported on the CNN website is turning into a
> disaster, with a humerous side to it.  Last time I saw a report, that
> car was stranded somewhere in the soutwest after man breakdowns, and
> had to be towed at a cost of $600 to the closest town with a repair
> shop, the crew having given up on repairing it themselves which got
> them slowly through the first 900-miles or so.
>
> What to me makes the story funny, is that the 'experts' directly in
> this demo expected fuel filter problems, and had cautiously packed 4
> spare fuel filters.  Part of the problem that they encountered on the
> road was that they had packed the wrong fuel filters, which didn't fit
> the car.  (Heck, doesn't everyone drive carrying 4 spare fuel filters?
> L0L). At last reading, and addition problem was that the fuel they
> were using had degraded the fuel lines themselves to the point of
> serious leakage. (I suspect that they meant the short neoprene flex
> links that connect the fuel lines, but the report was not that
> specific.)
>
> They should maybe have packed more duct tape! Smile
>
> I'm going to check on the CNN website later today, to see if there are
> any new reports. At last report, they were stranded somewhere outside
> of Phoenix (?).
>
> Harry C.- Hide quoted text -
>
> - Show quoted text -

Here is the latest from the CNN website today at 4:15 pm. Just click
on "Cody's Road Trip" and here is what you today get:

http://www.cnn.com/SPECIALS/2008/american.road.trips/

It's sad, and like I posted before, funny at the same time. For what
it's worth, here is a link to the site where you can follow "Cody's
Road Biofuel Avemture" that appears in the 'Special Coverage' section
(scroll down) on the CNN website.

http://www.cnn.com/

CNN today has no details of the "road trip", and has decided to
replace it with filler material that in no way describes this near
disaster. Picture the headlines if these naive kids had become
stranded out in the middle of the desert and died as a result of their
stupidity. My guess is that CNN pulled the plug on this, before it
became worse.

Let see. Follow cnn.com for future reports, if any.

Harry C.
 >> Stay informed about: HHO generator on a diesel? 
Back to top
Login to vote
Display posts from previous:   
Related Topics:
1992 300 2.5 Turbo Diesel - I am considering buying a 92 Mercedes 300 2.5 turbodiesel. Does this model/engine have the same reputation for durability, longevity, and fuel efficiency that other Mercedes diesels have?

Diesel Oil Pressure - Can't figure out why my oil pressure stays above 30 psi at warm idle on my W115 240D (616 4 cyl. diesel). Always before, I've seen it down below 15. Of course that was on cars with more than 250,000 miles. Is this cause for concern, or rejoicing? -- ...

Here we are - $3.00/gallon Diesel! - I ventured out this morning, drove past our local automotive oasis, and saw it, yes IT - $2.999/gallon Diesel, about a dime ABOVE premium gas. Bush's energy policy! They talk, talk, talk and talk and we pay, pay, and pay. What do you think about..

How are the Diesel models? - I have had a 1970 and 1988 sedans both with a gas engine.. I'm thinking of trying a diesel engine now, since gas is so high. How did the mercedes cars fare with a diesel?? any pros/cons to consider? I would be looking at late models, not brand new ones.....

Manual for '83 240 Diesel - Hi all, I just picked up an' 83 240 D with a WVO (waste veggie oil) supplemental fuel system and I'll be doing the clutch along with whatever other maintenance comes along. Can anyone recommend a good manual for this car. Thanks, Andy
   car problems (Home) -> Mercedes-Benz All times are: Pacific Time (US & Canada)
Page 1 of 1

 
You can post new topics in this forum
You can reply to topics in this forum
You can edit your posts in this forum
You can delete your posts in this forum
You can vote in polls in this forum



[ Contact us | Terms of Service/Privacy Policy ]